Illegal Immigrants Received Over $1 Billion in Welfare in Just Two Years

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The Los Angeles city and county homeless population rose sharply, almost 6 percent, in 2016. Nearly 47,000 people were living on the streets-28,000 of them were in the city. American families also struggled to get by.  Veterans, in need of services, begged for help. Yet despite all that, illegal immigrants reaped the benefits of government handouts.

Photo credit: Los Angeles Sentinel

Over $1.3 billion in welfare to be exact.

According to data obtained by Fox News, in 2015 and 2016 Los Angeles paid out nearly one-quarter of the amount spent on the entire city’s needy population helping illegals. The data was obtained from the county Department of Public Social Services, which is responsible for handing out the benefits. The agency also gives a snapshot of the financial costs associated with sanctuary and related policies.

Home to the largest population of illegal immigrants, more than any other county in the nation, Los Angeles allows illegals with children born in the U.S. to collect cash and food stamps. Better known as “anchor babies,” the children allow their illegal parents to beat the system. And it’s safe to say that the anchors are sinking the ships of citizen taxpayers.

Heritage Foundation Senior Fellow, Robert Rector, said the cost associated with sanctuary  cities’ policies is just the “tip of the iceberg.” The costs, according to Rector, associated with their housing, medical care, and police and fire rescue services for illegal immigrants can be upwards of $24,000 per family, per year.

Photo credit: OC Register

That averaged out to nearly three times the amount they paid in taxes-if they paid any at all.

Here is the breakdown of benefits illegals received in just two years:

  • More than 58,000 families received a total of $602 million in benefits in 2015.
  • More than 64,000 families received a total of $675 million in 2016.
  • During the first five months of 2017, more than 60,000 families received a total of $181 million.
  • Welfare and food stamp costs for the county’s entire population were $3.1 billion in 2015, $2.9 billion in 2016 and $1.5 billion so far in 2017.

This is the liberal definition of progress. That’s a real barn burner, isn’t it?

 

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