[A Kid Like Jake] Jim Parson’s Little Child Is Significantly Different Than Any Other Five-Year-Old

By Brock Swinson | Monday Monday Staff -    2018-02-01

In the film, A Kid Like Jake, the subject is not your average five-year-old. The boy prefers Disney princesses over trucks and soldiers. Beyond the hook, actors Jim Parsons and Claire Danes have been described as “stunningly good.”

Two parents trying to get their kid into a proper kindergarten sounds like a sitcom episode, but there’s so much more to the film. According to Vulture, the movie is both “deeply sympathetic” and “expansively humane and funny.”

The combination is rare and makes for a must-see film.

Jim Parsons Stars In A Kid Like Jake

Jim Parsons | Photo Credit Daily Mail

Emily Yoshida wrote, “The drama of A Kid Like Jake, which is small and contained and also somehow about everything, is the question of how to protect someone you’re responsible for…”

The real issue is finding the balance for their child. Is there something to protect the child from or not? When should you let the kid run wild and when should you pull in the leash? Is the kid even old enough to understand the dilemma?

Director Silas Howard got started on This Is Us and The Fosters, so some of those dramatic elements are there.

Having The Difficult Conversations In Life

Jim Parsons | Photo Credit Mateen Mag

The film comes from a play by Daniel Pearle. Most of the film revolves around casual conversations versus single-incident situations. In terms of the political climate, Jake is dealing with his gender identity.

In the film, the conversations happen around the school-counselor Judy, who is played by Octavia Spencer. While Clare Danes is expected to be at her best, some critics were surprised to see Jim Parsons level of commitment in the film.

“I’ll admit I didn’t know he had it in him,” wrote the author in regards to Jim Parsons performance. After walking around on eggshells for most of the film, the father character finally opened up about his true thoughts on the subject.

Despite the fact that they wanted to let the child keep towing the line, they’re soon going to have to make a decision. When the conversation finally came out, it was both ugly and progressive. Basically, they’re both right because they’re finally talking about the deeper issue.

Have you purchased your tickets for the new Jim Parsons movie?

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