Cosby Jury May Lean Towards Acquittal As Day 2 Deliberations End

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No Verdict Yet In Bill Cosby Case

Bill Cosby | Photo Credit Reuters

After the first full day of deliberations by the jury in Bill Cosby’s criminal trial for the alleged rape of Andrea Constand in 2004, there were several questions but essentially no verdict in the case.

The case began at 9am Wednesday morning in Norristown, PA. The jury, which was made up of seven men, five women, concluded for the day still thinking about the three felony charges of second-degree aggravated indecent assault against Cosby.

Cosby admitted that he gave Constand several blue Benadryl pills, but he believes the actions were consensual. If found guilty, it’s possible that the 79-year-old former comedian could face over ten years behind bars for these crimes.

Jury Came Back With Questions About Case

Constand, Cosby | Photo Credit People

Deadline reports:

“Tuesday’s deliberations follow the approximately four hours the jury spent weighing the case Monday after the defense wrapped and Judge Steven O’Neill provided instructions at the end of the weeklong trial that started June 5.”

“In the afternoon Tuesday, the jury asked to be read the testimony of Detective David Mason, the Toronto-area police officer who took Constand’s first statement in the matter in early 2005 soon after she told her family of the incident.”

“Called by the prosecution, Mason took the stand on the second day of the trial June 6, detailing what she Constand said happened at Cosby’s home in, how she was given “three pills,” and the effect they quickly had on her.”

Complications Within Pennsylvania Rules

Bill Cosby | Photo Credit LA Times

The New York Times reports:

“Under Pennsylvania rules, such hearsay evidence can be introduced if it directly rebuts something a witness said, which Judge O’Neill apparently concluded was not true of the testimony Ms. Jackson would have given.”

“But the United States Supreme Court has ruled that clearly relevant testimony that could plainly establish innocence must be allowed, said Dennis McAndrews, a Pennsylvania lawyer who has attended the Cosby trial.”

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